I like pictures.  CIPD published a paper that was honestly quite annoying, but contained a couple of little gems.  I was annoyed because the paper was entitled Web 2.0 and

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I have a lot of favorite bloggers.  I think I’ve tipped my virtual hat over to Rob Millard quite often here, but I was going backwards in time reading some

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From an applications technology point of view, we’ve all known that integration simply means connecting data from one software component to another.  Often we’ve used integration to mean that functional

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Gen Y.  They sit at their PC’s, play their games, and avoid all real social contact.  As they enter the workforce, their lack of social skills will be a mismatch

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Does HR participate in the identifying who is in a project team and who collaborates?  All too often, project teams are identified by people knowing other people and thinking that

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I mean really, what’s the big deal?  This is yet another social networking tool that has invaded our work spaces.  First it was personal access to e-mails during work hours. 

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Evil HR being the well know Evil HR Lady of course.  She and I share something in common – we work for prominent organizations, write a blog, and are anonymous

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Speaking about a client who never got anything done, an associate of mine once told me, “they are too in love with the process.”  TOC (the other systematic) stated in

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When it comes to innovation, the myth of the lone genius dies hard. Most companies continue to assume that innovation comes from that individual genius, or, at best, small, sequestered

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As part of the other systematic’s (Systematic Viewpoints” series on social media: Best practice #3: Collaboration requires a balance of freedom and governance to thrive. ((Systematic Viewpoints, September 11, 2007.

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Grow leaders who thoroughly understand the work, live the philosophy, and teach it to others. A succession plan is nice.  You in HR get to figure out how to grow

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Colin Kingsbury wrote an interesting piece about the end of social networking (I’ve borrowed the title to his post as I’m getting much too lazy these days).  He writes: Just

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If having the best talent is almost useless if you can’t get them to collaborate, then to some degree our mission in HR is assuring that we jump to the

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So much collaboration used to happen around “water cooler conversations.”  These may have been informal lunches, chats in the halls, and even chats next to the water cooler in the

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Getting the right people and retaining them is the start of building a great workforce. Engaging them to your brand is the next step. But the true work of optimizing

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