HR Technology Conference Reactions: Social Media Panel

I’ll admit.  I’m devastated.  Lexy Martin and Thomas Otter were both presenting at the same time as this session.  Had I the option, I would have pulled a Hermione Granger Time Turner thing.  You know where she goes back in time to take more classes?  I’d do that for these 3 sessions, but instead, I’m just a muggle.  (OK, enough of that nonsense.)

The panel consisted of Moderator: Kris Dunn (VP, HR, Kinetix ), Todd Chandler (VP, Learning and Performance, Helzberg Diamonds) , Ben Brooks (SVP & Global Director, Enterprise Communications & Colleague Engagement, Marsh Inc.),  Phoebe Venkat (Director, Digital and Social Media Communications, ADT).  As with my prior post, I’ll go with the same format:

Theme #1: File Centric versus People Centric. Perhaps this first theme is a bit obvious.  It really comes down to a definitional aspect of social versus where we have come from/are today.  There is nothing wrong with being file based, it’s here for a long time to come.  We operate in files today because that is how we store information and value.  Add to that we can easily search and tuck things away in a folder system, and we have a mediocre way to maintain information.  Thus, the next phase of evolution, if we are going to go social, we have to understand that the storage of prior information is not where it all is.  Instead, the generation of new information is paramount, and that comes from the exchange of ideas that social enterprise presents.  Thus, I call this a theme, but it’s really the starting point of the conversation – a definition of change.

Theme #2:  Email versus Social. If Theme #1 was a definition, perhaps Theme #2 is the problem statement.  Indeed, email is much more of a communication tool than a file storage tool as we all know when our corporate IT tells us we have gone over our 2 gig storage capacity.  The problem is that emails are so far from a real time production of value that it’s actually a barrier to the speedy creation of new insights.  Add that most of us also use emails for CYA and self preservation, and we quickly realize the major inhibitor that emails can be.  If we’re looking to protect ourselves and cover our tracks rather than provide new meaning to our jobs, this is a major directional problem for email.  So while social gives us productivity at the speed of conversation, emails are just too much of a security blanket for most workers to overcome in the very short term.

Theme #3:  Search and data mining. There are probably a couple aspects here.  The first one is about how we go about naturally doing our business today.  We’re organized in offices and cubes, or we go to meetings and sit at tables.  The interactions we have are largely based on who we see every day.  What is great about social is not that it allows us to reach past our normal daily interactions, but that it can help search for new contacts and encourage those interactions.  Sure we have emails, phone calls, instant messenger today, but with social we get to group ourselves logically based on something else other than location/job/department.  But we have to go beyond simple conversations.  The reason Facebook is not useful as an enterprise social tool is because you really can’t search the conversations.  Mining conversations for who is connected to who, what people are talking about, and how that impacts actual work and innovation is the key to creating value.

Theme #4:  Bad behavior. I remember 5 years ago when HR was just starting to enter the conversations about having social networks in the workplace.  Fully half of the conversations revolved around “bad behavior” or people just going crazy and doing/saying things they should not.  While you do have to set aside some rules of the road, you really can’t stop people from posting things.  Trying to moderate every comment would be absurd, and the consensus is that very little bad behavior actually happens.  The thing is, we should not have to create new social policies.  We already have them in place.  People also know how to behave already, and if they don’t, your managers should already be having these conversations.  This discussion presented one of the crowning moments of the conference for me (and I wish I could remember who said it).  “If you have a jerk, let them rise to the top so you can fire them.”  Another lovely quote, “HR… get over it.”

Theme #5: Creating change. Social for social sake is a bad idea.  You will get low adoption, and unless you are targeting your deployment to solving a real business problem, your audience will never really understand “why?”  Some of the suggestions revolved around polling the internal community for how your workers want to interact with each other, and then deploying solutions with the ability to say, “this is the tool you guys requested.”  A great example:  being one of the first at a dinner and not knowing anyone sucks.  But if you have a great host who is actively introducing people to each other, and contextually matching people’s interests, then you have really quick engagement.  The other interesting note that caught me off guard because it’s so basic, is not discounting the impact of faces and names.  If you think about Facebook, actually seeing faces is a pretty big part of how you interact with the tool.  There is a possibility that you see the face before you read the name, and that’s often how you engage with conversations.

 

5 Year Post

Can you believe it’s been five years?  I recently read my first post and actually thought it was an ok analysis of HRO vendors at the time.  Pretty funny to me how much things have changed, but also how much I’ve learned both through work and the blog.  I spent 2009 writing much less than I should have, but seem to have entered 2010 quite rejuvenated.  I’m pleased to say that I’m once again written out a few months as I used to do, and that my readership is growing once again after being a slacker for a year.  At any rate, I’m not sure how many others in the HR arena have made it this far, or who have written as much content, so it’s a milestone that I’m reasonably pleased with.

I don’t do a blogroll, there are far too many.  I do have a links list that references those whose posts I write about most frequently.  However, if I were ever to do an abridged blogroll, the below is it.  I know I forgot people, and I apologize.

I still pay attention to many of the people who inspired me when I started five years ago:

But also a whole new set of people who I follow on the blogs or twitter who have entered my scope (in the years after I started systematicHR) as content owners (although some of these have been content owners in a more traditional – non-blog sense for a long time):

I had originally said that I would stop writing at 4 years, but then 4 years came and went, and even though I was producing less, I just could not stop.  So I decided I’d get to 1000 posts and decide what to do, but I’m now confident I’ll keep writing after that milestone as well.  So long as there is content to write about, and as long as I feel that I’m doing it well, I’ll keep going.

So here’s to five years, and to my readers, and to all the people who inspire me.  Thank you.

-Dubs

Market Salary Rates

The HR Capitalist had a post the other day about pricing candidate salaries.  But as usual, I have my own opinions.

Say it with me – the market rate for any candidate is the $$ amount they will accept.  They’ve got info about what they are worth, you’ve got info about what they are worth.  When it all comes down to it, ranges give guidance, but you can’t rely on the extremes in the offer process.  You use the range to close business.  ((Dunn, Kris, December 8, 2009.  “Say It With Me: The Market Rate for any Candidate is the $$ Amount They Will Accept with Mimimal Counters…”  Retrieved from http://www.hrcapitalist.com/.))

I’m not totally sure I agree.  Chances are, the hiring organization does not really know what the prior salary of the candidate was.  We know that many candidates lie on resumes, and since their prior salary is not usually written, salaries probably also tend to get inflated.  We also have a pretty reasonable range of salaries that our compensation departments are doing.  These global surveys are pretty standardized across a number of consultancies, and are fairly predictable.  Candidates generally know the range of pricing they are looking at, as do the hiring organization.  It’s no secret what the typical ranges are for a candidate who is experienced and has been in the market.

However, rather than the market rate being how little a candidate will accept, I think that this idea is a recession strategy.  Since we have lots of people sitting on the bench right now either having been laid off or whatever, this strategy might work in the short term.  But in the long term, I’d like to think that we’re looking at recruiting and pricing more strategically.  If we are running a successful recruiting program, we are going to be recruiting people who are already employed, and perhaps are not even looking for jobs.  These are the best candidates as we all know (even if we all know it in theory but not in practice – they are the hardest candidates to get).  When we talk about positions that are highly collaborative or require a degree of innovation capacity, then the stakes go up significantly.  It’s not the lowest price a candidate will take, but based on the idea of a growth economy and the strategy of the position being filled, I believe it’s more about what the position is worth to the organization.

I’ve had it all ways, early in my career with a WAY lowball offer (which I took since I was rather inexperienced and it was still a good offer for where I was at – I later learned that all my peers were earning at least $10k more).  I’ve had the generous offer based on my skills and experience and the fact that I was not really interested in moving jobs, and I’ve had the fair offer (when I was actually on the bench myself).

At the end of the day, we need to make sure that we are hiring people in a cost effective way.  But if we decide that low salary pricing is the only way, then we deal a bad hand if we’re looking to fill strategic positions with high caliber employees.  The best people out there know they are the best and don’t take to this strategy well – they walk away instead.  Even the average people out there know where it’s at, and lowball salaries don’t make for long term engaged employees.  Decide for yourself if that $5k is worth disengagement or missing out on the best candidates.