Computer Economics does a survey about the TCO of IT support for ERP applications.  While the executive summary is almost totally useless, it’s obvious that in HR, HRIS support and

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It’s not often that you get to see the results of a survey before the submission deadline is up, but Lexy Martin shared a few preliminary numbers with me. While

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The following was contributed by Lexy Martin of CedarCrestone on a very interesting study highlighting key ROI metrics behind HR technologies: With ten years of survey data, and lots of

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Recruiting is an equation of numbers.  So many candidates = so many applicants = so many interviews = so many new hires.  This is a well known strategy in many

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Knowledge@Wharton had a great article recently about performance drivers.  Here’s a brief excerpt: As the Dean of a business school, you decide that the best reflection of winning is BusinessWeek’s

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If you haven’t figured out by now, I have a degree in Economics.  Game theory as published by the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosohy is “the systematic study of interdependent rational

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Right on the heels of SAP and Business Objects is the IBM and Cognos announcement.  Once again and like SAP, IBM didn’t need the capabilities.  They are in all probability

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Perhaps this is in reaction to Oracles buying Hyperion.  I always thought that SAP’s Business Warehouse product was pretty good.  Then again, PeopleSoft EPM isn’t bad either, and Oracle felt

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Use visual control so no problems are unhidden. One of the best modern tools we have is the data warehouse and the dashboard.  We have totally current metrics available to

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Continued Business Intelligence: Data Marts Life finally gets exciting. We’ve loaded our data through the ETL into an ODS. We’ve enriched the data into a usable form for aggregated, multidimensional

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Continued Business Intelligence: ODS So once you’ve gotten through your first round of ETL, you’ll have to load the data somewhere (the “L” in ETL). The ODS, or operational data

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Most normal HRIS people who sit around dealing with their normal HRIS and talent management systems haven’t given much thought to business intelligence much beyond the standard reporting capabilities provided

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CedarCrestone recently pushed out their 2007 Analytics survey. While I’m not sure my own experience matches theirs, there are some interesting trends to at least be noted. You can find

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I was listening to a presentation being given by a timekeeping vendor.  Within the demonstration, a report was run providing a detail of when people decided to take sick days,

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SHRM’s study of HR technology competencies (no link, but easy to find if you’re a member) revealed some not so surprising facts last year.  According to them (and every other

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HR function KPI’s are defined the same way as Human Capital KPI’s except that they are internally focused, rather than focused on the broader organization.  One should not be blind

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HR key performance indicators can be both incredibly difficult or quite simple to generate, depending on the type of indicator you’re looking for.  The main problem with your KPI’s is

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Colin had an article that I loved about ROI.  I’ve long since abandoned ROI for TCO and my compatriot Donald Glade I’m sure has similar feelings. You shave a nickel

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A recent McKinsey survey published in Mckinsey Quarterly  ((Reineke, Spiller, Ungerman, 2007.  “The Talent Factor in Purchasing.”  McKinsey Quarterly 2007 Number 1.  Page 6)) highlighted a study on the purchasing

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Lowell Bryan wrote in the McKinsey Quarterly that there is a new metric around: Times have changed and ROIC is no longer important – the new metric is profit per

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